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Posts Tagged ‘ORM’

From the picture Julie painted it sounds like the Entity Framework is finally coming together. While I’m sure it’s far from perfect the latest version would seem to have addressed MANY of the issues I ran into the first time I used it. With EF being such a strong contender, it would seem my decision has come down to nHibernate and EF. Microsoft safety versus the guys that have been doing it right for a lot longer… tough call!

Julie Lerman on Entity Framework 4.0Julie is back to talk about the improvements to the Entity Framework in version 4.0.

via .NET Rocks!.

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Just finished another excellent podcast from .NET Rocks which this time discussed the new features of the Entity Framework which is currently out in beta. While I haven’t had a chance to give it a try myself I’m very interested in what Daniel Simmons described. Having written off the EF as “not ready yet” and expecting the new release to still not meet my needs, I was very pleasantly surprised to hear that new features will make it into the final release that weren’t “supposed” to as of a few months back. I definitely need to reevaluate because based on what I heard in the interview the EF may be just a good a fit for me as nHibernate. I definitely recommend anyone interest in ORM check out the interview. (And go write some code)

Daniel Simmons is back this time to talk about the new features of ADO.NET Entity Framework version 4.

Daniel SimmonsDaniel Simmons is dev manager for the Entity Framework and LINQ to SQL team where his mission is to build a team and a product that will fundamentally change the way we build data-centric software. He has been at Microsoft for 10 years working on a variety of products. Before coming to Microsoft he worked as a consultant, founded an ISP and engaged in various other software pursuits.

.NET Rocks!.

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NHibernate keeps looking more and more like the enterprise .NET solution to choose…

But support in NHibernate for Sybase is not great. The basics work but some of the more advanced features are not implemented at all or are done poorly. Fortunately we have an excellent relationship with our vendor and have had for many years. Earlier this week they contacted me and mentioned that they will be undertaking an effort to improve their support for NHibernate and were looking for some beta testers.

via Sybase working to improve NHibernate support | Elegant Code.

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Interesting distinction.

It boils down to this, an object graph is just “State”. It has no associated “Statement of Intent”.

via Meta-Me : State vs Statement of Intent.

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Interesting if somewhat scathing discussion of using the Entity Framework for n-tier applications from the developers/designers of the next version of the Entity Framework. The feedback has inspired me to look at nHibernate again, and makes me wonder if the Entity Framework is really as safe a bet as one would assume Microsoft’s implementation of a technology would be.

The first version of Entity Framework provides convenient ways to load, manipulate and persist objects and relationships. As with many other O/RMs, Entity Framework has a state manager that tracks every change made. Existing objects are typically loaded first from the database, later modified, and finally the changes are saved back to the store.

Another feature, full graph serialization, makes it very easy for developers to ship around object graphs representing snapshots of the current state of the world, across execution boundaries.

The next version of Entity Framework will also support Persistence Ignorance. Therefore object graphs can now be made of POCO instances, which WCF now also supports.

Nonetheless, there is a task that belongs in any N-Tier application that still requires a great amount of work for developers using EF: decoding messages that represent state changes performed by the client, meant to be processed or persisted by the service.

via Entity Framework Design : N-Tier Improvements for Entity Framework.

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